Mnemonics

When students first start to begin to learn about researching, the idea of citing sources can be a complex topic. There are many rules, concepts and specific ways to cite information. One way to combat this frustration, is by introducing students at a young age of how, when and why you need to cite information. This mnemonic device is meant to give students a brief overview and background information on the concept of citation. One good way to teach young students is through the use of a mnemonic device to help students remember something, and introduce a new concept. While the librarian will want to instruct students on the specifics of citation, it can help students become familiar with the need to cite sources and information as they begin to delve into researching.

I came up with a mnemonic device, meant for students in second or third grade, who are just beginning to learn about the research process. This can be used with younger or older students as well, but it is meant to introduce students to citation and be displayed in the library for students to remember when and why they need to cite their information.

When you research, remember to CITE:

Credit other people’s work

Ideas that are not your own

Telling someone else’s story, quotes or words

Examples, evidence and facts

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Mnemonics

  1. Lisa, I love this mnemonic! I had thought of trying to come up with something that involved coming up with an acronym for the word “CITE,” but I couldn’t think of anything. I definitely could see myself using this in my library, even having it hung up for students to use as a reference.

  2. Great mnemonic, Lisa! Like Jessica, I could see making this into a poster or bookmarks and displaying it/them in the library. It’s such a great and simple way to help students remember to cite sources and how to distinguish between their own original words and another person’s ideas/thoughts. Love it!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s